Elena Kagan and Aharon Barak

SCOTUS nomnee Elena Kagan appears to be a big fan of Aharon Barak. Who is he, you wonder?

He was the longtime president of Israel’s BaGa”TZ (beit gavoha letzedek, Israel’s Supreme Court). Recognized by friend and foe as a brilliant legal mind, he acted as something like a legal philosopher-king who felt it was his duty to impose his enlightened vision on us benighted.

An activist’s activist judge, his most notorious quote is probably his assertion that “hakol shafit” (“everything is justiciable”/everything is subject to judicial review).

Granted, Barak operated in a legal vacuum a lot more often than his colleagues in the USA ever will, and Nature abhors a vacuum in law as well as in other things. And his activism was tempered somewhat by other factors, such as some degree of acccommodation of Israel’s security neeeds and a desire to recruit Supreme Court justices from perspectives other than his own.

in fact, this too is something he may have in common with Elena Kagan.

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Victor Davis Hanson Where Did the Tea-Party Anger Come From?

Works and Days � Where Did the Tea-Party Anger Come From?.

After 18 months, the people feel they have been had — in the way that a blow-dried mansion living, philandering John Edwards is hardly an advocate for the “other America,” or a green-scheming, instant multi-millionaire Al Gore is hardly a disinterested advocate for welcoming reasonable debate about a sustainable planet. Prophets fall harder, especially when “we are the ones we’ve been waiting for” prove to be a reflective of the Chicago way, the snooty ineptness of the Harvard lounge, and the shrill leftism of SEIU.

From The One to President Obamavuzela in just 18 months.

Some US elected officials seem to fail middle school geography

Un-freaking-believable. Milwaukee County supervisor Peggy West criticizes the Arizona border enforcement law on the ground that… Arizona does not directly abut the Mexican border. Video below thanks to FreethinkerNY of the Weaselzippers.us team.  The “WTF” moment is at 0:22.

Has this woman invented “postmodern geography”, in which longitude and latitude are social constructs, and Arizona not bordering on Mexico is just a “different narrative”?

“All at once, [Sky Marshal Hannah] Avram decided she’d had enough. Carried beyond a certain point, stupidity was personally offensive to her.” (David Weber and Steve White, “In Death Ground”)

[CORRECTION: FreethinkerUS is apparently not the same individual as FreeThinkerNY. The video can also be see as part of “Kruiser Kontrol” episode “Idiots without borders” (free or paid PJTV registration required) ]

0bama election: “A perfect storm of shallow stupidity”

This comment, on an article about foreign central banks going for gold, just encapsulates… it all (via Insty):

John|6.25.10 @ 10:39AM|#

The election of Obama was really the penultimate expression of our social and political neurosis. Think about it. He was black so he allowed people to feel good about themselves voting for a black man. Racial neurosis check. He was young, so it allowed people to think they were going to relive JFK. Boomer nostalgia neurosis, check. And he was from the upper middle class uber educated doucheoisie. Status and class neurosis check.

It was really all there. A perfect storm of shallow stupidity.

Dave Weigel resignation and Washington Post credibility

Some time ago, the Washington Post assigned Dave Weigel (formerly of Reason magazine) to cover the conservative “beat”. Weigel pretended to cover his beat from a neutral or even symathetic perspective, but was apparently anything but that. The Daily Caller got hold on what he wrote on fellow WaPo blogger Ezra Klein’s “Journolist” private discussion list of liberal journos.

Here it is, in all its dubious glory (warning: some NC-17 language, especially variations on “rat[bleep]”).

Insty has been all over the story. Some links gleaned from his blog (and the twitter feeds I follow):

POLITICO: Why the Weigel mess is the Post’s fault.

UPDATE: Hot Air: “I’m actually surprised and disappointed that the Post didn’t do more to defend Dave in this instance. The real problem, as I note above, is the lack of balance in the paper’s approach, and not any of the reporting that Weigel has done.”

Will Collier: “I still don’t think Weigel’s obnoxious JournoList rants were a firing offense, although failing to disclose his membership in Ezra Klein’s invitation-only Leftie club was a much more serious offense against Weigel’s readership. That said, I can understand why Weigel would leave at this point, and why the Post wouldn’t argue with him. Prior to yesterday, Weigel could claim to be something other than just another hostile Leftie journalist thanks to his previous stint at Reason. Once the mask was ripped off, though, the odds that anybody to the right of David Gergen would take Weigel’s calls dropped to somewhere around absolute zero.”

MORE: Jeffrey Goldberg: An Unhappy Day At The Washington Post.

Put aside the controversy over whether the Post, which was advised by its star blogger, Ezra Klein (who once advised parties unknown, via his Twitter account, to “fuck tim russert. fuck him with a spiky acid-tipped dick”) that Weigel would do an excellent and balanced job of reporting on conservatives, even understood that it was hiring a liberal, and not a conservative (Ben Smith has more on this aspect of the controversy), the issue in the newsroom today is, How did the Post come to this?

“How could we destroy our standards by hiring a guy stupid enough to write about people that way in a public forum?” one of my friends at the Post asked me when we spoke earlier today. “I’m not suggesting that many people on the paper don’t lean left, but there’s leaning left, and then there’s behaving like an idiot.”

I gave my friend the answer he already knew: The sad truth is that the Washington Post, in its general desperation for page views, now hires people who came up in journalism without much adult supervision, and without the proper amount of toilet-training.

I think there’s a shortage of adults to do the supervision. Plus, A Teachable Moment: If You Want Friends, Get A Dog.

Posted at 2:14 pm by Glenn Reynolds

UPDATE: Michael Walsh on the Weigel flap.

ANOTHER UPDATE: Weigel to HuffPo.

MORE: A roundup at Reason, including a report that Journolist is shutting down. But then, so did the Townhouse list that preceded Journolist . . . .

And what will happen to the Journolist archives?

STILL MORE: Rand Paul?

Plus, questions from the other Rand.

FINALLY: Sorry — “Townhouse” list. And I hear it’s still going on.

JIM GERAGHTY: If Weigel Had to Go, What Other MSM Figures Wrote Terrible Things on Journo-List?

Posted at 6:22 pm by Glenn Reynolds

WAPO OMBUDSMAN: Blogger loses job; Post loses standing among conservatives. “Instead of just a replacement, The Post might consider two: one conservative with a Klein-like ideological bent, and another who can cover the conservative movement in the role of a truly neutral reporter.”

Posted at 11:36 pm by Glenn Reynolds

You mean, the Post had any standing among conservatives, other than “slightly more credible than the New York Times” (which is the very definition of “damning with faint praise”)?…

Bonus unrelated to Dave Weigel and the WaPo (but what if we substitute “WaPo” for the federal gov’t in the sentence below?)

ALEX LIGHTMAN ON FACEBOOK: “After researching the issue carefully and interviewing people in a position to know, I can now reveal that the current primary purpose of the United State government is to bankrupt the United States. It comes as a relief to know this. So many things now make sense.” Least hypothesis, and all that.

Posted at 11:29 pm by Glenn Reynolds

On Being a 21st-Century Peasant – Reason Magazine

Ron Bailey fisks an article in which a jounalist without scientific qualifications (not automatically unqualified — except the New Class uses this argument often against the rest of us) calls for humanity to return to a subsistence farming lifestyle: On Being a 21st-Century Peasant – Reason Magazine.

Commenter “John” nails it:

The other thing that amuses me is that we end up in some kind of subsistence peasant lifestyle either way. If we ignored these clowns, [yet] all of their gloom and doom predictions turned out to be true, we would end up in the same place that we would be in if we had followed their advice, except of course that they wouldn’t be in charge.

Exactly.