COVID19 update, May 22, 2020: the human immune system; unlocked but the sky isn’t falling; professional courtesy; remdesivir study update

Derek Lowe wonders if there may be a unique COVID19 immune response. In the process, he gives a nice overview of the human immune system.

The NIH discontinued its double-blind remdesivir study. Mind you, not because the drug isn’t working, but because it is working substantially better than placebo controls, and they concluded that it was unethical to continue to feed patients placebos when they had a (somewhat) working drug on hand. Related.

Attacking  COVID19 from every angle, including molecular modeling on large-scale high-performance computing facilities.

Certain media outlets that cannot bring themselves to empathize with small business workers and owners who see their income dwindle to zero can somehow wax tearful about the plight of “sex workers” during the pandemic. Instapundit snarks:

“THE PRESS HAS SYMPATHY FOR SOME PEOPLE WHO ARE OUT OF WORK: The Fragile Existence of Sex Workers During the Pandemic. Sympathy for prostitutes, though, is probably just a species of professional courtesy.”

President Trump says he won’t close the country again if a second wave of coronavirus hits. Actually, this is probably sensible. The first closure was done in a “fog of war” situation. Now we understand a bit more about the epidemic and especially about what it is not

A study by a JP Morgan analyst reportedly shows that COVID-19 infection rates are declining in states that lifted lockdowns. I haven’t seen the original, but Georgia and Florida have been open for a while now and the sky hasn’t fallen on them. (Did it move sideways? Porcupine Tree fans can’t help asking.) 

 

But as a sanity check, here is a list of countries in Europe and the Middle East that have started opening a while ago and still (click on the names for Worldometer links) have nicely trending-down active case numbers:

 

ADDENDUM: Mike Hansen MD on vitamin D