Released on Kindle: “Freedom’s Light: Short Stories”

The first CLFA anthology “Freedom’s Light: Short Stories”  is now out on Kindle. The hardcopy edition will follow in a few days.

Net proceeds will benefit the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education (FIRE). I have read all the other stories in the anthology and, believe me, you won’t regret buying this!

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From the Amazon blurb:

Net proceeds from the sale of this anthology will be donated to the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education (FIRE), a nonpartisan, nonprofit organization dedicated to defending liberty, freedom of speech, due process, academic freedom, legal equality, and freedom of conscience on America’s college campuses.

The stories are:

  1. The Tenth Righteous Man (Nitay Arbel)
  2. Martian Sunrise (Matthew Souders)
  3. Backwater (Lori Janeski)
  4.  The Birthday Party (Daniella Bova)
  5. Dollars on the Nightstand (Bokerah Bromley)
  6. The City (A.G Wallace)
  7. The Nomod (Henry Vogel)
  8. Sara (Chris Donahue)
  9. Room to Breathe (Marina Fontaine)
  10. Victory Garden (Tom Rogneby)
  11. The Unsent Letter (Brad R. Torgersen)
  12. Credo Man (Carol Kean)
  13. The Fighting Beagles and the Attack at Dawn (Nick Cole)
  14. Shirt Story (Arlan Andrews)
  15. Polk’s Prophetic Property (W. J. Hayes)

Anthology “Freedom’s Light” coming January 16

On January 16, the CLFA anthology “Freedom’s Light: Short Stories” will be released on Kindle: Logotecture, Inc. uploaded the final proofread eBook, and are shooting for simultaneous paperback release.  It is available for pre-order.

Net proceeds will benefit the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education (FIRE). I have read all the other stories in the anthology and, believe me, you won’t regret buying this!

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From the Amazon blurb:

From the members and associates of the Conservative-Libertarian Fiction Alliance (CLFA) comes Freedom’s Light, a collection of short fiction that celebrates the human yearning for liberty. These stories will extol the value of human rights and the sacrifices of those who defend those rights. This collection features works from a wide variety of genres and a diverse set of authors, including Hugo Award nominee Brad R. Torgersen and 2016 Dragon Award winner Nick Cole. Freedom’s Light will entertain us and elevate the humanity we all share.

Net proceeds from the sale of this anthology will be donated to the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education (FIRE), a nonpartisan, nonprofit organization dedicated to defending liberty, freedom of speech, due process, academic freedom, legal equality, and freedom of conscience on America’s college campuses.

The stories are:

  1. The Tenth Righteous Man (Nitay Arbel)
  2. Martian Sunrise (Matthew Souders)
  3. Backwater (Lori Janeski)
  4.  The Birthday Party (Daniella Bova)
  5. Dollars on the Nightstand (Bokerah Bromley)
  6. The City (A.G Wallace)
  7. The Nomod (Henry Vogel)
  8. Sara (Chris Donahue)
  9. Room to Breathe (Marina Fontaine)
  10. Victory Garden (Tom Rogneby)
  11. The Unsent Letter (Brad R. Torgersen)
  12. Credo Man (Carol Kean)
  13. The Fighting Beagles and the Attack at Dawn (Nick Cole)
  14. Shirt Story (Arlan Andrews)
  15. Polk’s Prophetic Property (W. J. Hayes)

 

Writing updates: two short stories

Two short stories will be published soon. “One second chance deserves another”, a tale of love and the golden rule, will shortly go live just went live on Liberty Island.

Another, a piece of historical fiction called “The tenth righteous man”, will be included in the upcoming CLFA anthology, “Freedom’s Light”, which will be published by Victory Books.

In the meantime, a first draft of an espionage thriller came back from alpha reading, and I have started work on a romance novel set in modern Israel, which explores a love story across the secular-religious divide.

 

Double book review: “Domino” by Kia Heavey and “Chasing Freedom” by Marina Fontaine

Within a couple of days, both of the co-moderators of CLFA (Conservative Libertarian Fiction Alliance) had noteworthy books come out, one indie, the other published under the auspices of Amazon’s own Kindle Press. Kindle Unlimited subscribers can enjoy both books for free. If you do not own a Kindle, official reader apps are available for all major computer and mobile device OSes.

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Chasing Freedom” ($2.99 on Kindle, $10.99 in paperback),  Marina Fontaine’s powerful debut novel, was seeded by a short story submitted to a flash fiction context at Liberty Island. The story itself does not appear in the book, but the premises of its world building are rooted in it.

The novel is a near-future dystopia, but a very realistic one. Technology features, but all of it extant and in use as of the time of writing. As the author herself puts it, you can’t have much technological progress in a society where creativity is stifled.

The government is ‘elected’ between nominally ‘different’ Tweedledee and Tweedledum parties. In practice, it is best described as ‘soft totalitarian’. It holds an iron grip on both the flow of information and the lives of its subjects. Suburbs have been forcibly emptied out in the name of ‘restoring the environment’, with most people living in micro-apartments in overcrowded cities, eating subsistence-level processed rations. Healthcare is spotty and heavily rationed. The population resorts to a variety of coping and avoidance mechanisms that sound familiar to anyone who has lived in the former USSR or one of its satellite states. (Marina emigrated to the USA as a young adult.)

A Russian author invariably evokes images of very long novels that move at a glacial pace. As the fictional Howard Anderson quipped to his former operations officer, admiral Ivan Antonov, in “The Stars At War”:

“I read a Russian novel once,” Anderson cut in bleakly. “People with unpronounceable names did nothing for seven hundred and eighty-three pages, after which somebody’s aunt died.”

Not this novel. It is written very tightly (though not unpleasantly so), with essentially no fluff. The author was almost apologetic about its ‘short’ length, until I pointed out her book is about the same length as “Brave New World”, about 65K words (roughly the median length of novels on Amazon).

If you need superpowers, over-the-top action, and improbable Mary Sue superheroes to enjoy your fiction, go elsewhere. One of the most refreshing features to me was the novel’s realism: the protagonists are clever and resourceful but not implausibly so, while the antagonists are not ‘love-to-hate’ cartoon villains but ordinary, flawed people who gradually sell their soul to an inhuman system.
Marina writes like a native speaker. I could only find one typo: “his metal state”, which may have been Freudian, considering Marina’s musical predilections.

I read the book in two sittings and enjoyed the heck out of it.

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In contrast, Kia Heavey’s third novel “Domino” is a tale set in the animal kingdom. Its device of anthropomorphism in animals goes back to at least Aesop’s Fables — fittingly, Kyriaki (Kia) is of Greek heritage herself. Unlike Marina’s independently published novel, this book was published by Amazon under its own Kindle Press imprint after being nominated through the Kindle Scout program.

The eponymous protagonist is a tomcat keeping the suburban house of his mistress free of mice and rats. He lives in an uneasy truce with the dog and protects the chicken coop against small predators. In the process he makes the acquaintance of a mysterious but beguiling female feline who lives and hunts in the wild. The cats have an informal social life of sorts.

Then a mysterious feline orator named “Socrates” moves into the neighborhood, and starts preaching a message of coexistence between cats and rats. This ‘community organizer’, if you like, is manipulated by a couple of rodents through stroking his enormous intellectual and moral vanity. (Sounds familiar?)

Soon the entire neighborhood is predictably infested with rodents, who then start nibbling away (literally and metaphorically) at the lives of the others and upsetting the local equilibrium.

The theme of ‘social justice’ being imposed by moral preeners who need not live with the consequences, or make any of the sacrifices, runs strong. It gets to the point where cats with kittens are forced to feed ratlings out of ‘fairness’ even when they can hardly keep their own alive.

It is difficult to talk more about the plot without leaving spoilers. Suffice to say, the tale is well told, at a fairly brisk pace, and its denouement surprising.

One need not be a cat person to enjoy this book: I’m a lifelong dog person and was quickly drawn in, to furious yips and howls of ‘Treason!’ on the part of my faithful rat terrier.

Amazon appears to outsource its editing to a well-known firm in the business: the book looked as professional as anything I’ve seen from a major publishing house.

“Domino” can be enjoyed on several levels. For children and young teenagers, there’s a delightful animal adventure. For those who love the outdoors, Kia offers plenty of great atmosphere without getting long-winded.

Older and more politically literate readers, of course, will surely recognize the allegory: although the book is not an outright roman à clef , many of the calamities that befall the animals in the wake of “Socrates” have parallels in current or historical events, even as any allegory can only be taken so far.

Both “Chasing Freedom” and “Domino” are highly enjoyable reads, and both eBooks a steal at $2.99 and $3.49, respectively. I suggest buying both. Kindle Unlimited subscribers of course, can read both books for free.